Jack Abrams - Broadway BricksAfter interviewing so many talented stage performers, Broadway Wiz is shining a spotlight on creators and innovators. They may not have their name in a playbill, but all of these people have found ways to share their love for Broadway through their artistry.

This week we are featuring Jack Abrams. Jack is the creator of Broadway Bricks, a one-a-kind idea where Broadway and plastic meet. Building bricks (Legos) are made to look like characters from Broadway shows, ranging from classics like Phantom of the Opera to new contemporary musicals like Dear Evan Hansen and Mean Girls.

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

I am sixteen years old and I live in Los Angeles, California. I am the middle child. I have two brothers and I am by far the person who enjoys theatre and Broadway in my family the most. Theatre, thankfully, has always been available and accessible to me. I’ve been able to see many shows and grow up with this background and culture of Broadway and acceptance of creativity.

Where did the idea for Broadway Bricks come from and how did you get started?

Growing up, I always saw lego sets of Harry Potter, Marvel Superheroes, and Star Wars. I wanted to see my interests in lego: Broadway. Since these hopeful dreams weren’t going to show up anytime soon, I decided to make them myself. My first set was Hamilton in 2016. I was really proud of my design and posted it on twitter on Christmas Eve. The next day I woke up to thousands of notifications on my phone due to Hamilton creator, Lin Manuel Miranda, retweeting my work and giving it an “A+”. It truly felt like Christmas morning (because it was).

Broadway Bricks - SpongeBobWhat is your design process like and how do you select which figures to make?

Normally, I create the main principal characters from the show. However, sometimes I do include the ensembles because they deserve just as much credit. My first step is research. For opening night posts, I spend hours searching through social media for pictures from curtain calls, because shows rarely post production photos far in advance of opening, giving me time to actually create a set. After finding good, clear photos, I find the parts. I have a container full of “mini-figure” pieces and choose the ones that most resemble that character. Then I spend hours carefully drawing on the plastic pieces with sharpies and other fine markers to draw the costumes for th